Discussion

4.1 Analysis of results

30ºc is best for rust formation while 20ºc and 100ºc is not favourable for the reaction to occur.

4.2 Key findings

Room temperature, 30ºc is the most favourable temperature for rust to occur whereas 20ºc is too cold for the reaction to occur and 100ºc is too hot for the reaction to occur

4.3 Explanation of key findings

The rate of rust slowed down when the temperature was at 20ºc and 100ºc. This lead to the realisation that rust can be slowed down when the temperature is too hot or too cold. Thus, at the end of the experiment, we found out that it would be preferable to leave any iron/steel object not at room temperature, in order to slow down the rate of rust.

4.4 Evaluation of Hypothesis 

We proved our hypothesis correct by proving that rate of rust is affected by the temperature changes in the water.

4.5 Areas for improvement 

We have not been around for most of the experiment, and thus couldn’t keep track of the temperatures most of the time while the experiment was ongoing. In order words, we wouldn’t have been able to tell if any of the beaker’s contents were even one degree hotter or colder than it should be, and that could have greatly interfered with the results.
The following picture shows the result of an experiment where the variable changed is the temperature of the air. From the results on the picture, we can tell that the higher the temperature, the higher the rate of rust, which contrasts in our experiment’s result/conclusion.

1 comment:

  1. 4.1 Analysis of results

    30ºc is best for rust formation while 20ºc and 100ºc is not favourable for the reaction to occur.

    4.2 Key findings

    Room temperature, 30ºc is the most favourable temperature for rust to occur whereas 20ºc is too cold for the reaction to occur and 100ºc is too hot for the reaction to occur

    4.3 Explanation of key findings

    The rate of rust slowed down when the temperature was at 20ºc and 100ºc. This lead to the realisation that rust can be slowed down when the temperature is too hot or too cold. Thus, at the end of the experiment, we found out that it would be preferable to leave any iron/steel object not at room temperature, in order to slow down the rate of rust.

    4.4 Evaluation of Hypothesis

    We proved our hypothesis correct by proving that rate of rust is affected by the temperature changes in the water.

    4.5 Areas for improvement

    We have not been around for most of the experiment, and thus couldn’t keep track of the temperatures most of the time while the experiment was ongoing. In order words, we wouldn’t have been able to tell if any of the beaker’s contents were even one degree hotter or colder than it should be, and that could have greatly interfered with the results.
    The following picture shows the result of an experiment where the variable changed is the temperature of the air. From the results on the picture, we can tell that the higher the temperature, the higher the rate of rust, which contrasts in our experiment’s result/conclusion.

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